22 Uqaalaut

Dialogue: On the phone

Simiuni:
Ilisapi tavvaniippa? ᐃᓕᓴᐱ ᑕᕝᕙᓃᑉᐸ?Is Ilisapi there?
Luisa:
Aagga, anikainnaqsimajuq.ᐋᒡᒐ, ᐊᓂᑲᐃᓐᓇᖅᓯᒪᔪᖅ. No, she's stepped out for a little while.
Simiuni:
Qanga utirniaqqa?ᖃᖓ ᐅᑎᕐᓂᐊᖅᑲ? When will she be back?
Luisa:
Aatsuu. Uqaalaquviuk?ᐋᑦᓲ. ᐅᖄᓚᖁᕕᐅᒃ? I don't know. Do you want her to call you?
Simiuni:
ii. ᐄ.Yes.
Luisa:
Uqaalautiut qattiummat? ᐅᖄᓚᐅᑏᑦ ᖃᑦᓯᐅᒻᒪᑦ?What's your phone number?
Simiuni:
979-5555.979-5555

 

 

Jaani:
Juanasi taikaniippa?ᔪᐊᓇᓯ ᑕᐃᑲᓃᑉᐸ? Is Juanasi there?
Mimi:
Maanna aullaqsimajuq.ᒫᓐᓇ ᐊᐅᓪᓚᖅᓯᒪᔪᖅ. He's out of town right now.
Jaani:
Uvannut uqaalaqujunnaqqiuk utiqqat?ᐅᕙᓐᓄᑦ ᐅᖄᓚᖁᔪᓐᓇᖅᑭᐅᒃ ᐅᑎᖅᑲᑦ? Can you have him call me when he gets back?
Mimi:
ii. Kinaugavit?ᐄ. ᑭᓇᐅᒐᕕᑦ? Sure. Can I get your name?
Jaani:
Jaaniujunga. Uqaalautiga 979-0000.ᔮᓂᐅᔪᖓ. ᐅᖄᓚᐅᑎᒐ 979-0000. This is Jaani. My number's 979-0000.

Vocabulary

Irngiinaaqtautikkut titirarvigingaalaaliqqara.
e-mail (I will send him an...)
Kinaugavit?
Can I get your name?
Uqaalautiga 979-0000
My phone number is 979-0000
Uqaalautiit qattiummat?
What's your phone number?
Uvannut uqaalaqujunnaqqiuk utiqqat?
Can you have him call me when he gets back?
anikainnaqsimajuq
stepped out for a moment (she...)
aullaqsimajuq
away; out of town (he is...)
irngiinaaqtautikkut
e-mail (by ... )
katimajut
meeting (they are...)
tavvaniingittuq
She / he is not here.
tavvaniippa?
Is she / he there?
uqaalajuq
calls on the phone (he/she...)
uqaalaquviuk?
Do you want him to call you back?
uqaalaut
telephone
uqaalavigijara
calling him (I am...)
uqaqatigilagu
Let me speak to him.
uqautiguuk?
Do you want to speak to him?
uvaniittuq
here (she's...)

Grammar

calling or writing to someone

Inuktitut speakers use a structure that is different than English to indicate that you are calling or writing to someone:

uqaalavigijaanga
He calls me.
titirarvigijanga She writes to him.

To build these phrases:

1. Begin with the basic verb:

uqaala-
to call
titiraq- to write

 

2. Add the affix -vik. This is normally used to indicate a place. When it is added to uqaala- or titiraq- it means the person who is being called or written to.

3. Add the affix -gi.  This affix is used before double person endings and means "to have."

4. Add a double person ending to indicate who is calling/writing and who is being called or written to:

uqaalavigiviuk?Are you calling her?  / Did you call her?
uqaalavigijara I am calling her; or I called her.
Ippassaq uqaalavigilauqtaatit.She called you yesterday.
titirarvigivauk? Is she writing to him?
titirarvigijangaShe is writing to him.
Pinasuarusiulauqtumi titirarvigilauqtarma irngiinaaqtautikkut.You wrote to me last week by e-mail.

 

5.  So, when we put all of the pieces together:

uqaala+vi+gi+jara

We get, as a very literal translation:

"I have him as the place I am calling"

or, as we would say in English, "I am calling him."

double person endings - asking questions

In an earlier lesson, we introduced verb endings that involve both a subject and an object:

 takujara  I see her.
 qaujimajaanga   He knows me.


These are used to make simple statements.  There are a corresponding set of affixes that are used to ask questions that involve two people:

 qaujimavagit?  Do I know you?
 qaujimavara?  Do I know her?
   
 tukisivinnga?  Do you understand me?
 tukisiviuk?  Do you understand her?
   
 tusaavaanga? Does she hear me?
 tusaavaatit?

Does she hear you?

 tusaavauk?

Does she hear him?

If these affixes are added to a root ending in a vowel, they begin with the letter v:

takuviuk?
Do you see him?   

If these affixes are added to a root ending in q, they begin with the letter q:

ikajuqqiuk?Are you helping him?

If they are added to a root ending in any other consonant, they switch the final consonant to p and then begin with p:

malippiuk? Are you following him?