2 Qanuippisik?

Dialogue: What is your name?

Maina:
Unnusakkut.ᐅᓐᓄᓴᒃᑯᑦ. Good afternoon.
Taiviti:
Unnusakkut. ᐅᓐᓄᓴᒃᑯᑦ. Good afternoon
Maina:
Kinauvit?ᑭᓇᐅᕕᑦ?What's your name?
Taiviti:
Uvanga?ᐅᕙᖓ?(who) me?
Maina:
ii, ivvit.ᐄ, ᐃᕝᕕᑦ. Yes you.
Taiviti:
Taivitiujunga.ᑕᐃᕕᑎᐅᔪᖓ. My name is Taiviti.
Maina:
Asu. Unali kinauva? ᐊᓱ. ᐅᓇᓕ ᑭᓇᐅᕙ?I see. And who is this?
Taiviti:
Una Jaani.ᐅᓇ ᔮᓂ. This is Jaani.
Maina:
Tunngasugitsik.ᑐᙵᓱᒋᑦᓯᒃ. Welcome (to the two of you).
Taiviti:
Tunngasuppuguk.ᑐᙵᓱᑉᐳᒍᒃ. Response to "tunngasugitsik" (literally, 'We feel welcome.')

Vocabulary

ullaakkut
Good Morning
ullukkut
Good Day (afternoon)
unnusakkut
Good Afternoon.
unnukkut
Good Evening
uvanga
I; me
uvaguk
we; us (2)
uvagut
we; us (3+)
uirngaqtuq
sleepy (he/she is...)
uirngaqqiit?
sleepy (Are you...?)
uirngangittunga
sleepy (I am not...)
quviasuttuq
happy (he/she is...)
quviasuppiit?
happy (Are you ...?)
quviasuktunga
happy (I am...)
uqquuviit?
hot (Are you...?)
uqquujunga
hot (I am...)
qiuviit?
cold (Are you ...?)
qiunngittunga
cold (I am not...)
ivvit
you (1)
ivvilli?
and you?
ilitsik
you (2)
ilitsilli?
you two (what about...?)
ilitsi
you (3+)
ilitsili?
you (3+); what about...?
qanuippit?
How are you?
qanuippisik?
How are the two of you?
qanuippisi?
How are all of you?
qanuingi
fine
qanuinngittuguk
We (2) are fine.
qanuinngittugut
We (3+) are fine.
tukisiviit?
understand (Do you...?)
tukisijunga
understand (I...)
tukisinngittunga
understand (I don't...)

Grammar

4 » Asking Questions

Inuktut has a series of affixes that are used just for asking questions. To ask a question, we add one of these affixes to the end of a verb. The affix that is used changes depending on who the subject of the verb is. 
nirivit? Are you eating?
niriva? Is he / she eating?

 

The following affixes are used with roots that end in vowels:

tukisi- to understand
tukisivunga? Do I understand?
tukisivit? Do you understand?
tukisiva? Does he/she understand?
tukisivinuk? Do we (2) understand?
tukisivita? Do we (3+) understand?
tukisivisik? Do you (2) understand?
tukisivisi? Do you (3+) understand?
tukisivak? Do they (2) understand?
tukisivat? Do they (3+) understand?

 

If you want to add these affixes to a root ending in -q, you use the same endings as above, replacing the v with a q.
isiq- to come in
isiqqunga? Am I coming in?
isiqqit? Are you coming in?
isiqqa? Is he / she coming in?
isiqqinuk? Are we (2) coming in?
isiqqita? Are we (3+) coming in?
isiqqisik? Are you two coming in?
isiqqisi? Are you (3+) coming in?
isiqqak? Are the two of them coming in?
isiqqat? Are they (3+) coming in?
If the verb ends in any other consonant, you do the following:
  • replace the final consonant of the verb with a p
  • use the same endings above, replacing the v with a p.

As an example, let's use the verb sinik- / sinit-meaning to sleep. In the South Qikiqtaaluk dialect roots that end in -k or -t change the final consonant to -p before these endings:

sinippunga? Am I sleeping?
sinippit? Are you sleeping?
sinippa? Is he/she sleeping?
sinippinuk? Are the two of us sleeping?
sinippita? Are we (3+) sleeping?
sinippisik? Are you two sleeping?
sinippisi? Are you (3+) sleeping?
sinippak? Are the two of them sleeping?
sinippat? Are they (3+) sleeping?

 

5 » Personal Pronouns

In English, a verb must always be accompanied by a word to indicate who is doing the action:

I eat. She sleeps. They depart.

The highlighted words above are called personal pronouns.

Inuktut has personal pronouns although they aren't used as much as in English for reasons that will be explained below.

We'll start with the simplest personal pronouns:

uvanga I
uvaguk we; us (2)
uvagut we; us (3+)
ivvit you (1) 
ilitsik you (2)
ilitsi you (3+)

It is important to remember that Inuktut verbs always indicate who is doing the action through the verb ending: 

nirijunga I eat. 
siniktuq She sleeps.
aullaqtut They depart. 


Because the verb ending already tells us who is doing an action, personal pronouns are redundant and aren’t normally used.  Where personal pronouns are used is when :
  • you are talking about a person or an object without a verb
  • you are adding emphasis:
Qanuinngittunga.  ivvilli? I am fine, what about you?
uvanga? (who) me?
uvangalu qanuinngimmijunga. I (too) am fine.

 

Notice above the use of two little affixes : -li and –lu that can be tacked on to the end of the pronouns.

-li is used in conversation when you want to change the person or object you are talking about :

ivvit + li = ivvilli? What about you (1)?
uvanga + li = uvangali? What about me?

 

-lu is an affix meaning « and ».  It is added to a personal pronoun when you want to re-state something that has already been said.

uirngaqtunga I am sleepy.
uvangalu, uirngarmijunga. I, too, am sleepy.


When –li and –lu  are added to  personal pronouns ending in a consonant, they change the final consonants to l:

ilitsik + li = ilitsilli What about you (2)?
ivvit + lu = ivvillu you, as well.