12 Ulluit taqqillu

Dialogue: Are you working today?

Ilisapi:
Unnusa iqqanaijarniaqqit?ᐅᓐᓄᓴ ᐃᖅᑲᓇᐃᔭᕐᓂᐊᖅᑭᑦ? Are you working this afternoon?
Qajaq:
Aaggai, unnusa iqqanaijajjaanngittunga. ᐋᒡᒐᐃ, ᐅᓐᓄᓴ ᐃᖅᑲᓇᐃᔭᔾᔮᙱᑦᑐᖓ.No, I am not working this afternoon.
Ilisapi:
Ullaaq iqqanaijaqqauvit?ᐅᓪᓛᖅ ᐃᖅᑲᓇᐃᔭᖅᑲᐅᕕᑦ? Did you work this morning?
Qajaq:
Aagga ullaaq iqqanaijaqqaunngittunga.ᐋᒡᒐ ᐅᓪᓛᖅ ᐃᖅᑲᓇᐃᔭᖅᑲᐅᙱᑦᑐᖓ.No, I didn't work this morning.
Ilisapi:
Summat?ᓱᒻᒪᑦ? Why not?
Qajaq:
Ullaaq aanniavimmiiqqaugama. ᐅᓪᓛᖅ ᐋᓐᓂᐊᕕᒻᒦᖅᑲᐅᒐᒪ.I went to the hospital this morning.
Ilisapi:
Aanniagavit?ᐋᓐᓂᐊᒐᕕᑦ? Are you sick?
Qajaq:
ii, niaqunngujunga. Suli qauppat iqqanaijajjaalaanngittunga.ᐄ, ᓂᐊᖁᙳᔪᖓ. ᓱᓕ ᖃᐅᑉᐸᑦ ᐃᖅᑲᓇᐃᔭᔾᔮᓛᙱᑦᑐᖓ. Yes, I have a headache. I won't be working tomorrow either.
Ilisapi:
Asu.ᐊᓱ. Oh, dear.

Vocabulary

Gavamalirijikkut
Departrment of Executive and Intergovernmental Affairs
aaggaqai
probably not; I don't think so.
aippiq
Tuesday
ippassaani
yesterday (the day before...)
ippassaq
yesterday
iqqanaijaqtuq
works (he/she...)
naammattuq
It's O.K.
naattiinguja
Sunday
naggajjau
Monday
nami?
where?
pinasuarusiulaaqtumi
next week
pingatsiq
Wednesday
qanga?
when? (past/future)
qanuinngittuq
fine (he/she/it is...)
qauppat
tomorrow
siqiniq nipijuq
sunset
siqiniq nuijuq
sunrise
sitammiq
Thursday
sivataarvik
Saturday
tallirmiq
Friday
ullaaq
morning
ullulimaaq
all day
ullumi
today
ulluq
day
ullutamaat
every day
ungaliagu
tomorrow (the day after...)
unnuaq
night
unnuk
evening

Grammar

future tense


Inuktitut has a number of ways of talking about events that will happen in the future.

One way is to insert the affix -niaq between the verb and the subject ending. -niaq- is used only for events that will happen later the same day.

Suvit? Suniaqpit?
What are you doing? What will you be doing?
   
nirijunga
niriniaqtunga
I am eating I will be eating

When -niaq- is added to a root that ends in q, the q changes to r.

kaapituq + niaq + tunga = kaapiturniaqtunga.
  I will be drinking coffee.
When -niaq- is added to a root ending in k, it changes the final k to n.
malik + niaq + tuq = malinniaqtuq
He is going to be here.
When -niaq- is added to a root ending in t, it changes the final t to n.
tavvaniit + niaq + tuq = tavvaniinniaqtuq
  He is going to be here.

The double n above is not just a quirk of spelling. When you pronounce this word, you have to hold the n sound for twice as long as you would a single n.

In Iqaluit, -langa- is the affix that is most commonly used for an event in the immediate future.  -langa- can be attached directly to a root that ends in a vowel.  When attached to a root ending in a consonant, it deletes the final consonant:
Ullumi aullalangajuq He is leaving town today.
-laaq- is another affix that is used to talk about the future. -laaq- is used for events that will be happening the next day or further into the future.
Arvialianiaqtunga Arvialialaaqtunga

I am going to Arviat (later that day)

I will be going to Arviat (sometime in the future).
 
takuniaqpugut takulaarivugut
See you soon See you later/ See you then.
 
pinasuarusiulaaqtumi next week
If -laaq- is added to a stem that ends in a consonant, it deletes the last consonant.
aullaq + laaq + tuq = aullalaaqtuq.
  He will leave town.