12 Ulluit taqqillu

Dialogue: Are you working today?

Qajaq:
Unnuksaq sananiaqpit?ᐅᓐᓄᒃᓴᖅ ᓴᓇᓂᐊᖅᐱᑦ? Are you working this afternoon?
Juana:
Aakka, unnuksaq sanajjaanngittunga.ᐋᒃᑲ, ᐅᓐᓄᒃᓴᖅ ᓴᓇᔾᔮᙱᑦᑐᖓ.No, I am not working this afternoon.
Qajaq:
Ullaaq sanaqqauvit?ᐅᓪᓛᖅ ᓴᓇᖅᑲᐅᕕᑦ? Did you work this morning?
Juana:
Aakka ullaaq sanaqqaunngittunga.ᐋᒃᑲ ᐅᓪᓛᖅ ᓴᓇᖅᑲᐅᙱᑦᑐᖓ.No, I didn't work this morning.
Qajaq:
Qanuimmat?ᖃᓄᐃᒻᒪᑦ? Why not?
Juana:
Ullaaq aanniarvingmiiqqaugama. ᐅᓪᓛᖅ ᐋᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᖕᒦᖅᑲᐅᒐᒪ.I went to the hospital this morning.
Qajaq:
Aanniaravit?ᐋᓐᓂᐊᕋᕕᑦ? Are you sick?
Juana:
ii, niaqunngujunga. Suli qaukpat sanajjaanngittunga.ᐄ, ᓂᐊᖁᙳᔪᖓ. ᓱᓕ ᖃᐅᒃᐸᑦ ᓴᓇᔾᔮᙱᑦᑐᖓ. Yes, I have a headache. I won't be working tomorrow either.

Vocabulary

ulluq
day
ullumi
today
ullaaq
morning
unnuksaq
afternoon
unnuk
evening
unnuaq
night
maanna
now
ippaksaq
yesterday
qaukpat
tomorrow
pinasuarusiq
week
pinasuarusiulaaqtuq
next week
pinasuarusiulauqtuq
last week
pinasuarusiup nunngua
weekend
taqqiq
month
taqqiulaaqtuq
next month
naggajja
Monday
aippaa
Tuesday
pingajuat
Wednesday
qitiqquut
Thursday
ullutuinnaq
Friday
sivataarvik
Saturday
naattiinguja
Sunday
qanuiliuqpit?
What are you doing?
qanuiliulaaqpit?
What will you be doing?
qanuiliuniaqpit?
What will you be doing (later today)?
What did you do earlier today?
qanuiliulauqpit?
What did you do?

Grammar

6 » Future Tense

 

When talking about events that will happen in the future, we use the affix -niaq- that is inserted between the verb and the subject ending:

Hulivit? Huliniaqqit?
What are you doing? What will you be doing?
   
niriyunga niriniaqtunga
I am eating I will be eating

 

When -niaq- is added to a root that ends in q, the q changes to r :

 

kaapituq + niaq + tunga = kaapiturniaqtunga.
  I will be drinking coffee.

 

When -niaq- is added to a root that ends in k, it changes the final k to ng  :
malik + niaq + tuq = malingniaqtuq
  He is going to follow.

 

When -niaq- is added to a root that ends in t, it changes the final t to n  :
talvaniit + niaq + tuq = talvaniinniaqtuq
  He is going to be here.

 

The double n above is not just a quirk of spelling. When you pronounce this word, you have to hold the n sound for twice as long as you would a single n.

 

Unlike other Inukititut dialects, Inuinnaqtun speakers use -niaq- both for events that will happen later today and those that will happen farther in the future:

 

ublumi aullarniaqtugut aqugu utirniaqtugut

We will be leaving town today.

We will be returning tomorrow.
Finally, be aware that when starting a sentence with the idea 'when', you use different words, depending on whether you are talking about an event in the future or in the past:
Qakugu tikinniaqpa When will she arrive?
Qanga tikippa? When did she arrive?

7 » Past Tense

When talking about events that have happened in the past, it is essential to understand an important difference between English and Inuinnaqtun.

In English if one is talking about an event in the past, one almost always makes a change to the verb to indicate this.  Below are just a few of the ways we do this in English:

     present      past
He sleeps. He slept.
She eats. She ate.
We are hunting. We were hunting.

 

In most cases in Inuinnaqtun, we don't make changes to the verb to indicate that something has happened in the past:

he eats niriyuq
he ate niriyuq

 

In conversation, there will always be clues as to whether 'niriyuq' refers to an event that is happening now or one that has already happened.  A couple of examples:

Tatja niriyuq He is eating right now.
Ublaaq niriyuq. He ate this morning.

 

Verbs that refer to some sort of motion almost always refer to an event in the past when they are combined with basic subject endings (-yunga/-tunga, -yutit/-tutit, -yuq/-tuq) :

itiq- to enter
itiqtunga I came in.
   
ani to go out
Anivat? Did they go out?
If we want to indicate that these events are happening in the present, we have to add the affix -liq-:
itiliqtunga I am coming in now.
aniliqqat? Are they going out?

There are affixes that do emphasize that something has happened in the pastOne example is -haaq-, an affix that is used to describe actions that have happened in the immediate past.

 itihaaqtuq  She just came in.
 tikihaaqtugut  We just arrived.