18 Ilakka

Dialogue: Birthdays

Aani:
Pinasuarusiup nunnguani sulauqqilli?ᐱᓇᓱᐊᕈᓯᐅᑉ ᓄᙳᐊᓂ ᓱᓚᐅᖅᑭᓪᓕ?What did you do this weekend?
Simiuni:
Anaanakkutinnuulauqtunga. Ivvilli?ᐊᓈᓇᒃᑯᑎᓐᓅᓚᐅᖅᑐᖓ. ᐃᕝᕕᓪᓕ? I went to my mother's place. What about you?
Aani:
Nukakkutinnuulauqtunga. Nalliutilaurmat. ᓄᑲᒃᑯᑎᓐᓅᓚᐅᖅᑐᖓ. ᓇᓪᓕᐅᑎᓚᐅᕐᒪᑦ.I went to my younger sister's place. It was her birthday.
Simiuni:
Asukuluk. Nukait qatsiuliqqa? ᐊᓱᑯᓗᒃ. ᓄᑲᐃᑦ ᖃᑦᓯᐅᓕᖅᑲ?I see.  How old is your sister now?
Aani:
37-nik arraaguqaliqtuq.37-ᓂᒃ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᖃᓕᖅᑐᖅ. She is thirty-seven.
Simiuni:
Qangakkut nalliutisuunguvilli? ᖃᖓᒃᑯᑦ ᓇᓪᓕᐅᑎᓲᖑᕕᓪᓕ?And when is your birthday?
Aani:
Juunimi nalliutisuungujunga. ᔫᓂᒥ ᓇᓪᓕᐅᑎᓲᖑᔪᖓ.My birthday is in June.

Vocabulary

ukuaq
daughter-in-law; sister-in-law (brother’s wife)
uik
husband
sakiqpaaq
grandparents-in-law
sakik
parents-in-law
sakiaq
sister-in-law (husband’s sister)
panik
daughter
nuliaq
wife
nukaq
younger sibling (of the same sex)
ningauk
son-in-law; brother-in-law (of the same sex)
najak
sister of a male
irniq
son
ilagiit
family
attak
aunt (father’s sister)
ataatatsiaq
grandfather
ataata
father
anik
brother of a female
angijuk
older sibling (same sex)
angak
uncle (mother’s brother)
anaanatsiaq
grandmother
anaana
mother
akkak
uncle (father’s brother)
ajak
aunt (mother’s sister)
airaapik
brother-in-law (sister’s husband)
airaapik
sister-in-law (brother’s wife)

Grammar

42 » Transitive Verb Endings

So far, we have been using simple endings with verbs:

takujunga
I see.
-junga indicates the subject of the sentence, or who does the seeing. It doesn’t indicate the object of the sentence, or what we see.

In English, if we want to talk about what we see, we would add a pronoun to the sentence to indicate an object:

I see her.

In Inuktitut, we use verb endings that indicate both the subject and the object of the sentence. These are known as transitive verb endings.

takujunga (basic verb ending) I see.
takujara (transitive verb ending) I see her.
   
maliktunga I follow.
maliktakka I follow them.
   
tusaajuq She hears.
tusaajaatit She hears you.

Here are the simplest forms of the transitive verb endings:

Where I am doing the action:  
takujagit  I see you.
takugikkit (alternate S.Qikiqtaaluk ending) I see you.
takujara I see him / her / it.
   
Where you are doing the action:  
takujarma You see me.
takuginnga (alternate S.Qikiqtaaluk ending) You see me.
takujait You see him.
   
Where he/she/it is doing the action:  
takujaanga She sees me.
takugaanga (alternate S.Qikiqtaaluk ending) She sees me.
takujaatit She sees you.
takugaatit (alternate S.Qikiqtaaluk ending) She sees you.
takujanga She sees him.

 

The basic form of these affixes begins with a j- when added to a root that ends in a vowel. If these affixes are added to roots that end in a consonant, the -j changes to t-:

maliktara I am following him.
ikajuqtaanga He/she helps me.

ALTERNATES

Be aware that in the South Qikiqtaaluk region, you may hear or see the following alternate endings:

takugikkit I see you.
takuginnga You see me.
takugaanga He/she sees me.
takugaatit He/she sees you.

These endings vary depending on the last consonant of the root they are added to.  After a root ending in q-, the endings start with r-

ikajuq- to help
ikajuraanga He is helping me.
ikajurikkit I am helping you.

After a root ending in k- or t-, the endings start with kk-

tukisinngit- to not understand
tukisinngikkaanga She isn’t understanding me.
tukisinngikkinnga You aren’t understanding me.