19 ilajaakka

Dialogue: Family reunion

Amaruq:
Najakuluk, parnaliqqit?ᓇᔭᑯᓗᒃ, ᐸᕐᓇᓕᖅᑭᑦ?Sister,are you getting ready for your trip?
Mini:
Anikulungai. ii, parnasijunga.ᐊᓂᑯᓗᖓᐃ. ᐄ, ᐸᕐᓇᓯᔪᖓ.Hey brother. Yes I am preparing.
Amaruq:
Asuapittauq. Quvianaalungai ataatatsiatta nunaminaapinganuulaaratta ilajaagiitigut. ᐊᓱᐊᐱᑦᑕᐅᖅ. ᖁᕕᐊᓈᓗᖓᐃ ᐊᑖᑕᑦᓯᑦᑕ ᓄᓇᒥᓈᐱᖓᓅᓛᕋᑦᑕ ᐃᓚᔮᒌᑎᒍᑦ.Hey, me too. Isn't it exciting that we are going to our grandfather's old camping site
Mini:
Aahaillaak, irnikukka ukuakulukkukka malilaarmijuuk ammalu irngutakka.ᐋᕼᐊᐃᓪᓛᒃ, ᐃᕐᓂᑯᒃᑲ ᐅᑯᐊᑯᓗᒃᑯᒃᑲ ᒪᓕᓛᕐᒥᔫᒃ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᐃᕐᖑᑕᒃᑲ. Indeed, my sons and their wives will be coming along as well as my grandchildren.
Amaruq:
Asuapik, anaanakkumattauq tamarmik qiturngangit irngutangillu atangirniusajugut. ᐊᓱᐊᐱᒃ, ᐊᓈᓇᒃᑯᒪᑦᑕᐅᖅ ᑕᒪᕐᒥᒃ ᕿᑐᕐᖓᖏᑦ ᐃᕐᖑᑕᖏᓪᓗ ᐊᑕᖏᕐᓂᐅᓴᔪᒍᑦ.I see. All of my mother's family, their children and grandchildren, all of us will be there.
Mini:
Alianait! Katimmakainnalaaqtuapiujugut aullaqsimaluta ummiakkut.ᐊᓕᐊᓇᐃᑦ! ᑲᑎᒻᒪᑲᐃᓐᓇᓛᖅᑐᐊᐱᐅᔪᒍᑦ ᐊᐅᓪᓚᖅᓯᒪᓗᑕ ᐅᒻᒥᐊᒃᑯᑦ. Awesome! We will all be together for a little bit when we are out camping by boat.
Amaruq:
ii, ajjiliuqtaugiaqalaaqtugut atangirluta ilajaagiitigut. ᐄ, ᐊᔾᔨᓕᐅᖅᑕᐅᒋᐊᖃᓛᖅᑐᒍᑦ ᐊᑕᖏᕐᓗᑕ ᐃᓚᔮᒌᑎᒍᑦ.Yes, we will have to have our picture taken - all of our extended family.
Mini:
 ii, ningaurma nukanga ajjiliurisikkaaq ilaulaarmijuq.ᐄ, ᓂᖓᐅᕐᒪ ᓄᑲᖓ ᐊᔾᔨᓕᐅᕆᓯᒃᑳᖅ ᐃᓚᐅᓛᕐᒥᔪᖅ. Yes, my son-in-law's younger brother is a professional photographer. He will also be coming.
Amaruq:
Asuapimmarik! Piulaaqtuviingaluk anaanavuk, anaanatsiavuk, ataatatsiavuk ajjiliuqtauliqpata kinguvaangillu. ᐊᓱᐊᐱᒻᒪᕆᒃ! ᐱᐅᓛᖅᑐᕖᖓᓗᒃ ᐊᓈᓇᕗᒃ, ᐊᓈᓇᑦᓯᐊᕗᒃ, ᐊᑖᑕᑦᓯᐊᕗᒃ ᐊᔾᔨᓕᐅᖅᑕᐅᓕᖅᐸᑕ ᑭᖑᕚᖏᓪᓗ.Excellent! It is going to be so good. Our mother, our grandmother, our grandfather, they will finally have their photo taken along with their decendents.
Mini:
iiraapik. Siaruttauq anikuluk.ᐄᕌᐱᒃ. ᓯᐊᕈᑦᑕᐅᖅ ᐊᓂᑯᓗᒃ. Yes, indeed. See you later, brother.

Vocabulary

parnattuq
preparations to leave (he/she is making...)
uik
husband
nuliaq
wife
aippaq
spouse; partner; common-law
amauq
great-grandfather
amauqpaaq
great-great grandfather
irngutaq
grandchild
attak
aunt (father’s sister)
ajak
aunt (mother’s sister)
akkak
uncle (father’s brother)
angak
uncle (mother’s brother)
airaapik
sister-in-law (brother’s wife)
sakiaq
sister-in-law (husband’s sister)
airaapik
brother-in-law (sister’s husband)
illuq
cousin
illukuluapik
cousins (both female)
illuarjuk
cousins (both male)
sakik
parents-in-law
sakiqpaaq
grandparents-in-law

Grammar

37 » Possession (advanced)

There are ways of expressing two or even three levels of relationships within the same sentence, i.e. when the possessor has its own possessor:

anaanaga my mother
anaanama aninga my mother's brother
anaanama aningik my mother’s two brothers
anaanama aningit my mother’s brothers (3+)

The -ma ending relates the root word back to me, but it also relates the root to another person or people.

Note that the word that follows -ma must take the ending -nga (in the singular), -ngik in the dual or -ngit in the plural to show that it is part of the possessive relationship.

The ending -ma could be followed by an object as well as a person:

nukaq a younger sibling of the same sex
nukarma umianga my younger sibling’s boat
   
panik daughter
panimma nunasiutinga my daughter’s car

Note also in the above examples that -ma changes the final -k of a noun root to -m and final -q to -r, while -nga deletes a preceding consonant.

The following table sets out the variations of this type of construction:

-ma  
anaanama aninga my mother's brother
   
-tta  
anaanatta aninga our (2+) mother’s brother
   
-vit  
anaanavit aninga your (1) mother's brother
   
-ssik  
anaanassik aninga the brother of your (2) mother
   
-ssi  
anaanassi aninga the brother of your (3+) mother
   
-ngata  
anaanangata aninga his/her mother's brother
   
-ngatta  
anaanangatta aninga the brother of their (2) mother
   
-ngita anaanangita aninga
anaanangita aninga the brother of their (3+) mother

 

Remember, in the third person, if you want to name the possessor, you add the ending -up to the end of the name or noun:

Simiuniup nunasiutinga Simiuni’s car
angutiup qimmingit the man’s dogs

From the table above, we can use the endings -ngata (singular) and -ngita (dual/plural) to build even more complex layers of relationships:

ataatama piqatingata umianga my father’s friend’s boat; the boat of my father’s friend
piqativit nuliangata aninga your friend’s wife’s brother; the brother of your wife’s friend
Simiuniup nunasiutingata kiinga the key to Simiuni’s car
angutiup qimmingita anungit the man’s dogs’ harnesses; the harnesses of the man’s dogs